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ALL THE BOYS LOVE MANDY LANE NEWS:

'Mandy Lane' Trailer

June 27, 2007 -- Now being released with the streamlined title "Mandy Lane," the much-anticipated slasher film has a trailer. Check it out here. Rumor has it the film will hit theaters as early as July 20.

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'Mandy Lane' Horror Film Picked Up by The Weinsteins at Toronto Fest

Sept. 18, 2006 -- This just in from the LA Times at the Toronto International Film Festival:

"A band of first-time L.A. producers along with their first-time director went to Toronto for the first time in their short careers to present their horror film, 'All the Boys Love Mandy Lane.' And within four hours after the credits rolled, the neophytes had made a deal with the Weinstein Co." "'It couldn't have been more dreamlike than this,' said 28-year-old Felipe Marino, one of the film's producers and one of the founders of Occupant Films, the upstart L.A.-based production company that made the movie on a six-figure budget and sold it for a reported $3 million to $4 million. 'It's still a shock. We've never done this before, and we know that this doesn't normally happen.'

"The movie is being touted as the kind of innovative film that critics will pay attention to and one that also will appeal to a broader audience than most horror movies.

"Reviewers here have said 'Mandy Lane' is to the horror genre what 'Brick' was to film noir: set in the realm of high-school social politics with strongly developed characters, but still firmly rooted in the genre it takes on.

Reminiscent of 1980s teen-slashers, the movie is centered on the title character, an all-achieving popular girl who is a track star and the crush of every boy at school. Mandy heads off to a weekend of debauchery at a ranch with a group of friends, and soon it all goes wrong and the killing begins.

'It's got depth in the characters and it's based in the reality of high school,' said director Jonathan Levine.

The movie, which was shot in Texas in four weeks, is the first produced by Occupant Films and Marino, who until two years ago was a student in the Peter Stark Program at USC's School of Cinema-Television.

Source: L.A Times, Sept. 15

The Film Festival Programme defines the film like this:

"Taking a hammer to the polished image of Hollywood teen horror, All the Boys Love Mandy Lane rips apart all the glossy mallrat stereotypes. Welcome to the post-Columbine world of dead teenagers as envisioned in this impaled, slashed and twisted take on the genre.

"Prepare for an arrow straight to the heart when you meet Mandy Lane. As the title character, Amber Heard - a relatively new face on the scene - radiates a confidence that is at once modest and sexy. Mandy is a shy, beautiful loner in the sea of insecure ostentations that make up the average high-school population. Male hormones rage out of control at the sight of her.

"Mandy has managed to keep away from the sexpot elite, who date jocks and put down their less attractive peers. Caught in the pubescent sexual crosshairs of several dudes eager to bed her, she accepts an invitation, along with two fellow hotties, for a weekend in the countryside at a Texas ranch house. It promises to be a decadent outing, to say the least.

"The girls are surrounded by sun-baked fields far from any supervision, aside from a sombre and hunky ranch hand (Anson Mount) who ignites their fantasies. The party gets started: drugs, booze and lust abound as the lads compete in the glorious quest to be the first to bone Mandy. She deflects their sloppy adolescent advances all day and, after dusk, an admirer hiding in the shadows starts to eliminate the competition for Mandy's attention. Her secret Valentine has a larger plan for her, writing a declaration of love with the blood of her classmates.

"Beautifully shot and crafted with a calculated sense of calamity, All the Boys Love Mandy Lane is smart and razor-sharp. Director Jonathan Levine and writer Jacob Forman's teens are more in tune with reality than most dotting the popular culture landscape, and the film feels closer to Larry Clark territory than to 'The O.C.' Sexual innuendo and promiscuity rule this social order.

Levine's film exposes a deep and foreboding sense of dread hovering over the typical, happy teen outing. Teen crushes may never have been less sweet and innocent.

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